About & Around

Live as close as possible to the stream in which your life flows.

Poolside summer magic, from The Magician 

gqfashion:

"@Shinola shines on with this stunner of a baby blue Runwell watch. Bring on the new at #Baselworld 2014, too." - @TedStaffordGQ #WatchWednesday

gqfashion:

"@Shinola shines on with this stunner of a baby blue Runwell watch. Bring on the new at #Baselworld 2014, too." - @TedStaffordGQ #WatchWednesday

The past few years have been a weird, wonderful, and crazy run for Old Spice and Wieden & Kennedy. Back in early 2009, P&G realized that 60% of men’s body wash was purchased by women. With an ingenious dual-target strategy, they set out to start a conversation between the sexes, and Isaiah Mustafa and “The Man Your Man Could Smell Like” was born. They pioneered real-time brand building and content creation with their YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter response programs, and did it better than the multitude of brands who have been trying to do it since. Oh yeah, they also more than doubled their sales of body wash in less than a year and have been on an upward climb since. 
The marketing landscape looks a lot different now in 2014 than it did in 2009, and Old Spice & W&K are blazing new awesomely weird trails into the digital future. Set up fake websites to shame the extremes of male douchey behavior with offers of “Cologne with Protein” or “Bargain Tribal Tattoos?” Sure why not? The sites are hilariously robust, and they make it easy to prank your friends via Facebook, Twitter or e-mail. I’d be willing to bet people are spending a lot more time on these sites than with a :30 TV ad, plus it’s great to think about the fact that someone on the marketing team had to go out and secure vanity URL’s like smellpulse.com and freshbodycoupons.com. 
For their new hair product campaign (in which they have literally made the hair the hero), they included a real phone number in the storyline for the ad. Knowing industry media would be the first to pick-up on this when they released the spot online the week before the Super Bowl, they staffed the number and gave away 2 Super Bowl tickets to a writer who called from Buzz:60. Tons of free PR was generated in the week leading up to the game with the brand explaining they did it because, “when you get a lady’s phone number, you call it.” It’s not every day you can call a media strategy cocky, but that’s the first word that came to mind when I saw this. 
Most recently, the Old Spice/W&K team seems to have hit their creative outré stride with this idea. I would have loved to have been in the room when this one was pitched. Product benefit? Your hair’s the star when you use Old Spice Hair. Alright, well then let’s have this guy’s hair crawl of his head and play any Huey Lewis song you request. Drop mic. Leave the room. 
It’s rare that a brand can transcend from advertising into pop culture. But Old Spice has done it by continuing to own and evolve the confident cocky weirdness they created with Mustafa 5 years ago. They’re pushing the boundaries for ways to reach and engage their audience, and I can’t wait to see what they come up with next. Stay weird Old Spice, stay weird.

The past few years have been a weird, wonderful, and crazy run for Old Spice and Wieden & Kennedy. Back in early 2009, P&G realized that 60% of men’s body wash was purchased by women. With an ingenious dual-target strategy, they set out to start a conversation between the sexes, and Isaiah Mustafa and “The Man Your Man Could Smell Like” was born. They pioneered real-time brand building and content creation with their YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter response programs, and did it better than the multitude of brands who have been trying to do it since. Oh yeah, they also more than doubled their sales of body wash in less than a year and have been on an upward climb since. 

The marketing landscape looks a lot different now in 2014 than it did in 2009, and Old Spice & W&K are blazing new awesomely weird trails into the digital future. Set up fake websites to shame the extremes of male douchey behavior with offers of “Cologne with Protein” or “Bargain Tribal Tattoos?” Sure why not? The sites are hilariously robust, and they make it easy to prank your friends via Facebook, Twitter or e-mail. I’d be willing to bet people are spending a lot more time on these sites than with a :30 TV ad, plus it’s great to think about the fact that someone on the marketing team had to go out and secure vanity URL’s like smellpulse.com and freshbodycoupons.com.

For their new hair product campaign (in which they have literally made the hair the hero), they included a real phone number in the storyline for the ad. Knowing industry media would be the first to pick-up on this when they released the spot online the week before the Super Bowl, they staffed the number and gave away 2 Super Bowl tickets to a writer who called from Buzz:60. Tons of free PR was generated in the week leading up to the game with the brand explaining they did it because, “when you get a lady’s phone number, you call it.” It’s not every day you can call a media strategy cocky, but that’s the first word that came to mind when I saw this.

Most recently, the Old Spice/W&K team seems to have hit their creative outré stride with this idea. I would have loved to have been in the room when this one was pitched. Product benefit? Your hair’s the star when you use Old Spice Hair. Alright, well then let’s have this guy’s hair crawl of his head and play any Huey Lewis song you request. Drop mic. Leave the room.

It’s rare that a brand can transcend from advertising into pop culture. But Old Spice has done it by continuing to own and evolve the confident cocky weirdness they created with Mustafa 5 years ago. They’re pushing the boundaries for ways to reach and engage their audience, and I can’t wait to see what they come up with next. Stay weird Old Spice, stay weird.

Beautifully shot, beautifully told. 

Simply, genius. Samsung has created an app that harnesses your phone’s processing power while you sleep to contribute to scientific research. Just plug in, sleep, and the app begins to process data sent from the Similarity Matrix of Proteins database. The database and the trials which it conducts require massive processing power to analyze protein sequences. These sequences are the key to enabling scientists to better understand genetics, heredity, molecular biology and ultimately find cures for diseases like Alzheimer’s and  cancer. 

Free beer, eh?